May 28, 2013

Florida's Foliage, and a Flower




I was in Florida over the weekend for a family wedding. It was sunny and warm and windy: perfect weather for getting away from the cold and wet Northeast. I wandered around the grounds of the hotel, and down to the beach, with my camera; there was plenty to catch my eye in the shapes and colors of foliage. In one large planter, different foliage of strong character and clear shape, made a dramatic statement.




The bright, light green heavy leaves connected, pattern-like, to a strong curving stem.




These leaves had a gentle, orange-tinted fuzz; their light color stood out from the darker foliage.




Down towards the beach were the rounded large leaves of the Sea Grape, with its fruits newly formed.




A beach plant has leaves splashed with red.




Not all the leaves at the Florida shore were bold and dramatic; here is a delicate-leaved plant with subtly red stems wandering across the sand.




Another combination of red stem and green leaf, with leaves sticking out like spikes from their sheaths.




I saw a few small flowers, but this pink one was the most interesting. It reminded me of pea flowers and might be in the same family, but just a lot more sexy. The wedding was held at the Flagler Museum, which had beautiful grounds; a lovely courtyard with gorgeous plantings; and the most remarkable tree I have ever seen, a kapok tree with a huge spreading trunk that seemed to me like something out of a fairy tale (you can see images of the tree here). It was a treat for me to feast my eyes on new forms, so different from those of Vermont.


8 comments:

  1. Wonderful textures and rhythms here! And fleshy leaves without teeth.

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  2. The second image looks like one of your paintings to me--beautiful!
    Joan

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  3. Thanks, Joan and Susan; I really enjoyed seeing these plants. They are very structural, so appeal to my sensibility.

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  4. As usual: your great eye delights! That trunk buttressing on the Kapok tree is fantastic.

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    1. Thank you, Julie. I so regretted not having my camera when I saw that remarkable tree. Its roots seemed like live creatures, and the spreading trunk was incredibly dramatic.

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  5. A beach plant has leaves splashed with red. Would you happen to know the name of this plant. I was visiting my aunt this pass weekend in S.C.and I notice it was in her front yard . I never noticed it before do you know the name of it? It is so pretty with the red center coming into a point.

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    1. Anon, I think I remember a friend of mine saying it was a wild form of poinsettia. Try googling.

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  6. yes....wild poinsettia

    From Google
    "Euphorbia heterophylla, also known under the common names of (Mexican) fireplant,[2] painted euphorbia,[2] Japanese poinsettia,[2] desert poinsettia, wild poinsettia, fire on the mountain, paintedleaf,[2] painted spurge,[2] milkweed,[2] and kaliko plant, is a plant belonging to the Euphorbiaceae or spurge family." Just found it in our yard!

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